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Mdadm Cannot Start Dirty Degraded Array

well, failed. No LVM or other exotics. /dev/md0 is a /data filesystem, nothing there needed at boot time. How to reply? Boot with a CentOS 6 disc. –Michael Hampton♦ Sep 11 '12 at 16:57 By the way, I have 3 partitions ... 1st is /boot ... 2nd is swap ... have a peek at this web-site

And what was: > Raid Level : raid5 > Device Size : 34700288 (33.09 GiB 35.53 GB) is now: Raid Level : raid5 Array Size : 138801152 (132.37 GiB 142.13 GB) Take another look at those size reports of mine, how could it run or do anything really? Hope this will help some people. md/raid:md2: failed to run raid set.

mdadm -A /dev/md_d0 on the other hand fails with that error message in both cases (so I couldn't use it before that && operator). Attach a cdrom drive to an IDE slot on the motherboard. They hope these examples will help you to get a better understanding of the Linux system and that you feel encouraged to try out things on your own.

My hunch is that the problem stems from the superblock indicating that the bad device is simply "removed" rather than failed. I've never touched this file, at least by hand. # by default, scan all partitions (/proc/partitions) for MD superblocks. # alternatively, specify devices to scan, using wildcards if desired. Register. 11-28-2006 #1 cwilkins View Profile View Forum Posts Private Message View Articles Just Joined! Seeing some md's recognised, seeing something about 2 out of 3 mirrors active.

Firstly it would be helpful if I could boot the system and repair the RAID array with logging available so how can I remove the RAID array from the boot process? Disclaimer: if it has one and if it is connected. Can Trump undo the UN climate change agreement? FWIW, here's my mdadm.conf: Code: [[email protected] ~]# grep -v '^#' /etc/mdadm.conf DEVICE /dev/sd[bcdefghi]1 ARRAY /dev/md0 UUID=d57cea81:3be21b7d:183a67d9:782c3329 MAILADDR root Have I missed something obvious?

myrons41 View Public Profile View LQ Blog View Review Entries View HCL Entries Visit myrons41's homepage! I mean... Browse other questions tagged linux ubuntu raid software-raid mdadm or ask your own question. Don't even want to go to sleep till I try some more to bring this raid to obedience.

About the kanji 鱈 Is there a word for being sad about knowing that the things that make you happy will eventually go away How do pilots identify the taxi path http://superuser.com/questions/117824/how-to-get-an-inactive-raid-device-working-again Join Date Nov 2006 Posts 4 Eeek! This morning I found that /dev/sdb1 had been kicked out of the array and there was the requisite screaming in /var/log/messages about failed read/writes, SMART errors, highly miffed SATA controllers, etc., Rebooting the machine causes your RAID devices to be stopped on shutdown (mdadm --stop /dev/md3) and restarted on startup (mdadm --assemble /dev/md3 /dev/sd[a-e]7).

I'm at the end of my rope... Check This Out I am hoping you guys could help me avoid this. I looked at the end of dmesg again formore hints:# dmesg | tail -18md: pers->run() failed ...raid5: device hdm4 operational as raid disk 0raid5: device hde2 operational as raid disk 6raid5: I know as a last resort I can create a "new" array over my old one and as long as I get everything juuuuust right, it'll work, but that seems a

The raid in top has the size the same as the components: 34700288 It should read: 138801152 (which is 4x), similarly as this one in the same box of mine: sA2-AT8:/home/miroa more stack exchange communities company blog Stack Exchange Inbox Reputation and Badges sign up log in tour help Tour Start here for a quick overview of the site Help Center Detailed My hunch is that the problem stems from the superblock indicating that the bad device is simply "removed" rather than failed. Source Notices Welcome to LinuxQuestions.org, a friendly and active Linux Community.

Ok, I tried hacking up the superblocks with mddump. I'm attempting the echo "clean" fix, but getting this error: Code: [email protected]:~# echo 'clean' > /sys/block/md1/md/array_state -su: echo: write error: Invalid argument Any ideas why? Are you new to LinuxQuestions.org?

I looked at the end of dmesg again formore hints:# dmesg | tail -18md: pers->run() failed ...raid5: device hdm4 operational as raid disk 0raid5: device hde2 operational as raid disk 6raid5:

The drive was good as evidenced by the boot up state and the disk SMART evaluation, and the recent few days. Here's a detail for the array: Code: [[email protected] ~]# mdadm --detail /dev/md0 /dev/md0: Version : 00.90.03 Creation Time : Tue Mar 21 11:14:56 2006 Raid Level : raid6 Device Size : ok... I have my RAID drives attached via a PCI express SATA card, so I'm guessing at boot time the system couldn't see those drives yet. –Teh Feb 23 '15 at 16:44

Join Date Nov 2006 Posts 4 Backup successful! Ultimately, I started reading through the kernel source and wandered into a helpful text file Documentation/md.txt in the kernel source tree. Using raid5 on 4 drives and LVM+ext3. have a peek here I know my way around Linux a bit but RAID is something new.

The status of the new drive became "sync", the array status remained inactive, and no resync took place: Code: [[email protected] ~]# cat /proc/mdstat Personalities : [raid6] [raid5] [raid4] md0 : inactive